New Year’s Eve: A Pseudo-Retrospective

Christmas arrived yesterday evening, 12.30.15. My husband had ordered some books for me from my Amazon wish list, and my Dad and his girlfriend’s package of gifts arrived as well. I am tired tonight, trying to believe it is truly New Year’s Eve. The two months that I loathe are about to begin. These cold, dark days make it feel like January and February will never end. (February, the shortest month of the year, feels interminable to me).

I’m thinking about a lot of things, nothing organized or interesting, but here are some New Year’s memories that come readily to mind:

New Year’s Eve, 1995. This was one of the last nights that I stayed at my maternal Grandma’s house, the first New Year’s after my Grandpa had died. I was a junior in high school. While growing up, she lived one street over from us, within easy walking distance. We found ourselves at her house a lot throughout the years, but New Year’s was a special treat. She made popcorn on the stove using a heavy metal saucepan. She would jostle the pan repeatedly over the hot electric burner as the kernels pinged against the metal pot. Afterward, she poured butter and salt over the freshly-popped kernels, and we ate it happily in front of the TV, watching the excitement in Times Square. We cut up old advertisements that came in the mail, a makeshift confetti, and tossed it upward as the clock struck midnight.

On this particular New Year’s, I was recovering from one of the worst asthma attacks that I’d ever had. Just a few days earlier, I had spent time in the emergency room, taking back-to-back breathing treatments. My lungs had felt like they were paralyzed, like filled balloons that could not receive any more air. I was exhausted from several days of struggling to breathe – there was no where for the air to go. Those breathing treatments brought instant relief to my breathing and my anxiety. For some reason, my Grandma’s house had fewer triggers, and my Mom wanted me to recover there for a day or two. It worked. New Year’s truly felt like a recovery. I wrote in my journal early the next morning, the curtains still drawn against the dim, gray outdoor light, everyone still asleep, but I could breathe, I no longer struggled. I munched on leftover popcorn as I wrote, and I was thankful.

New Year’s Eve, 1999I was working the night shift in a Dayton, Ohio area hospital, the leading trauma hospital in the area. Y2K was looming. We were prepared for a major malfunction of technology. As Respiratory Therapists, we were worried about our mechanical ventilators (i.e. “life support” machines) failing, so we had Ambu-bags on stand-by in all of the ICU rooms (these are basically big football-looking balloons that we used to manually pump oxygenated air into a patient until mechanical ventilation was available). I found an empty patient room, turned on the TV to see Times Square, all those happy people laughing and yelling, not a single person worrying about potential ventilator failures. Eleven fifty-five p.m., and I started pacing, mentally preparing my strategy. Eleven fifty-nine p.m., I started holding my breath. Suddenly, midnight. The lights never flickered, the ventilators kept humming right along. I don’t remember anything else about that overly-hyped night.

New Year’s Eve, 2001. There is a photograph from this particular evening, taken high up in a sky scraper in Chicago, looking at (what was then called) the Sears Tower. It was the day after our friend Robert’s 30th birthday. I remember two things: it was absolutely freezing cold, the wind whipping mercilessly between buildings, stinging my face so that my eyes watered constantly; my lips felt swollen and my teeth wouldn’t stop rattling. We walked around downtown, as this was part of Robert’s birthday wish – to enjoy the atmosphere of one of his favorite cities. I was miserable and couldn’t wait for the night to end. The second memory is of eating at Uno’s Pizzeria that night. It was a tiny place that seemed to be wedged thoughtlessly into the building, too small and crowded for my taste. We waited outside in the cold for a long time, but when we finally got inside, I didn’t mind the continued wait. Finally, finally, I was warm. There were pictures of celebrities on the walls, people who had been in there and had written glowing messages of appreciation for the place. In my journal, I wrote of these celebrities and wondered what greatness they saw in Uno’s that I couldn’t see. I still do not see the big deal about Chicago. And I don’t remember actually celebrating the new year that night.

New Year’s Eve, 2005I had just finished my evening shift at a small hospital in southern Indiana. Our friends Robert and Tricia were in town, on their way back to New Jersey. We were completely out of their way, but Robert’s love for adventure made provisions for side trips like visiting us. I arrived home near midnight, where I met them at my tiny apartment. We had a post-birthday celebration for Robert, starring a chocolate cake with pink lettering (thanks to his then-seven-year old daughter). We also met their newest daughter, born in August, a beautiful child who smiled and laughed at my acne-covered face. In my journal, I wrote about how their seven-year old daughter slept on the couch bed in the living room with me, and we told stories to each other until two or three in the morning, like best friends sharing secrets after a long separation. Those were the days when she still liked me, before adolescence took over, before I was no longer cool.

New Year’s Eve, 2015. I am sitting here in the old rocking chair, legs propped up on the purple swiss ball. My husband is off playing soccer. I am here, thinking about how much I hate January, how I refuse to make resolutions, but also thinking that this year is the year that I get serious about writing. For Christmas, my husband bought me three books (two have arrived, the other still a mystery that has yet to arrive). Last night, lying in bed, I read the first book to arrive, called True Stories, Well Told. “Well told” indeed, so well that I didn’t go to sleep until after midnight (on a work night), riveted by essays about cancer, abuse, hitchhiking around Europe and living with a traumatic brain injury. I have been in a writing funk for a few months, which was unexpected after almost an entire year of consistent journal writing. This book fanned the embers, brought life back to my writer’s soul.

And now I am here, writing garbage, but writing. Soon, we will pop the non-alcoholic bubbly, toast our good-byes to a difficult year, and I’ll scribble my pens to a new year full of real and imagined adventures.

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